The Most Amazing Visual Bible Memory Tool You’ll Ever Meet, for Visual Learners (duh!)

I have just outlined the most jaw dropping mnemonic tool for VISUAL Learners related to studying and memorizing scripture.

Here’s the major premise of the mnemonic for you.

By the way, in this Visual Bible Memory World, here’s what the continents are:

  • The Land of Law (North America)
  • The Land of History (Europe)
  • The Land of Poetry (Asia)
  • The Land of Prophets (South America)
  • The Land of Gospels (Africa)
  • The Land of Letters (Australia)
  • The Land of Prophesy (Antarctica)

I’m telling you this, because it’s hard to see in the way that Prezi moves so quickly. But if you label your contents the way I listen, then you could draw a fake equator, almost right across the globe where the top half is the Old Testament, and the bottom half of the globe is the New Testament. Except that you have to put South America above this fake equator. Still, for a visual learner, this works just fine.

Screen Shot 2017-09-19 at 8.19.36 PM

Here’s the second example for you.Screen Shot 2017-09-19 at 8.19.50 PM

There. I hope you start using this mnemonic devise for you and your kids, and share it with any other visual learners you know. If you went through both slide shows then you will earnestly understand the value of that kind of visualization.

P.S. If you have an auditory learner, they might learn this by repeating after you and hearing you say it. You can also ascribe a quick theme songs to Lands, and Towns if that would help them with the association. Maybe the Land of History uses a Super Hero theme, and each Town uses a different super hero’s theme song. Hear what I’m singing?

If you have a kinesthetic learner, you could build a model world, and a model town as you’re studying. Or, you could make lift-the-door flaps for one chapter you’re memorizing and put a picture behind each door to trigger your memory about that verse, like a lap book. You could associate a certain smell with each Land. Maybe the Land of Revelation smells like peppermint (because we need to wake up when we read Revelation!). Or maybe the the Land of Letters feels like sand (touch some sand because Australia is a huge island), while the Land of Poetry feels like rice (touch some rice because it’s in Asia and Chinese food comes with rice). Can you feel what I’m pushing?

Have fun getting the Word in you!,

Robyn Cooper

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How to do a Classical Conversations Book Haul, Cycle 2, weeks 11-14

I enjoy sharing my book hauls so you can gather some ideas for your next library visit. We are well embedded in the grammar stage of classical learning, which means we are focused on the who, the what, the when. Sometimes we learn the how and why, but I don’t necessarily embellish for topics for things that are complex like things of historical nature. Rather, we make indulgences in science to learn the why or how of things, listen to more music or look at more art. More often we are just out exploring nature and the things around us.

Let’s get into the book haul now.

We happen to have the timeline cards for classical conversations, and the science cards. We also have a science encyclopedia. But when I approach a new section of learning for CC, I look up about three weeks of information at a time. This happens one of two ways:

Method one. Online in my library’s online catalogue… in this case I ask the library to reserve the books for me and set them aside. This allows me the flexibility of picking them up from the check out area at anytime, kids in tow or not

Method two. At the library either by myself or with the kid’s librarian’s help… in this case I need my husband’s help focusing on my kids while I search

Before I go searching and compiling. Before I use either pick up method, I just make a list of the upcoming topics covered by CC. In this case, it was weeks 11-14. I just literally handwrite a list starting with the timeline, history, science, math, English and geography topics. And in that list, I look for overlapping subjects, so I can consolidate the books I need if possible.


I also look up the book list from Half A Hundred Acre Wood’s blog online. And the kindergarten, preschool, and picture books lists from my local library, including early readers. And note any upcoming holidays.

Back to compiling my books. If I’m using method one, then while I’m logged in to the library’s catalogue I write down call numbers and sections where I will find the topics I want to cover. Then I literally go hunting, comparing a few books from each section to make sure I have one appropriate for my young Kinder-aged son. I have a heavy preference for cartoon books, comic books, picture books, story books or rhyming books if I can find related ones. Next, a heavy preference for simple explanatory books. We may not read every one word for word. Sometimes I summarize. Sometimes we soak in the pictures if the book is very advanced but that’s all that was available.

I may have to ask the librarian for help if certain books are missing. See how not everything is crossed off my lists? That’s okay!

Here’s how my lists end up looking before I go hunting.


If I’m using method 2, I look at user ratings to help me decide which ones to pull.

My kids also get to pick books at random that they’d enjoy.

This is what we ended up with for weeks 11-14 for Cycle 2 of classical conversations.


In my last book haul, you’ll see we covered Week 11 already. I don’t mind doing weeks over again, whatsoever. We have a break week due to Thanksgiving, so we can take advantage of that buffer.

This is where the type A in me halts to a grand stop. We read twice a day, before rest time and bed time. We read four or five books… or if the books are long, a chapter… or if the books are really long, a page. We “dog ear” where we left off and pick it up again whenever we feel like it.

As our three weeks comes to an end we either return the books we’ve had enough of, or renew the books we want more time with.

We are discovering so much this way! My son’s favorite book from the last haul was called “Plagues, Pox, and Pestilence”. I never would have guessed that he’d be so into that! And on our drive today he proclaimed “I really love Buzz Aldrin” and asked me if I knew about Vostok missions.

Here’s one more view of the book haul for weeks 11-14 for Cycle 2 for you.


There’s no way around the fact that this is time-consuming. Method one takes a solid hour and a half for me to cover three CC weeks. Method two takes me a good two hours. But we are finding the benefits are innumerable.

I didn’t include the silly books my sons picked this week or the early readers, since I am focusing on how you can do a CC haul.

We are in the grammar stage, but my young Kindergartener wants to know what he’s memorizing, so off we go every three weeks to fill in some of those learning pegs with a little meat.

While some moms have impressive book collections, we don’t have the space or money to purchase all these books every week, and I’d feel gridlocked if I did it that way anyhow. I do, however, prioritize making the time.

I hope this helps some of you enjoy CC more!

Cycle 2 Weeks 8-11 Book Haul

Here’s my book haul for K-3rd for Classical Conversations weeks 8-11 for Cycle 2. I take account upcoming holidays too.


We like very hands-on math activities. Here’s a little space puzzle for skip counting 14’s. I found the image by searching space images in google. I glued the popsicle sticks with elmer’s glue on the back of the image. Then I used a kitchen paring knife to carefully slice through and divide the popsicle sticks on a cutting board. My son didn’t want to do it until I walked away and acted like it didn’t matter if he did it or not. 5 minutes later he “surprised” me, and asked me for help with the last few pieces which weren’t numbered.

Sun observations for Cycle 2 Week 8

Since we are studying parts of the sun for week 8 of classical conversations in cycle 2, we found a sun program, and a star program to go enjoy at Fremont Peak.

Amateur astonomers volunteer to set up their scopes, or the observatory’s scopes, and happily share their knowledge with you.
Firstly, look at the spectacular view we are enjoying! For you CCers, this is definitely a scrubland. The clouds are not our friends when observing the heavens, but they sure are pretty!

“When I think of all this, I fall to my knees and pray to the Father, the Creator of everything in heaven and on earth.” 

‭‭Ephesians‬ ‭3:14-15‬ ‭NLT‬‬

“Who can understand the spreading of the clouds and the thunder that rolls forth from heaven?”

‭‭Job‬ ‭36:29‬ ‭NLT‬

We also found some creepy crawlers that were entertaining. I will load these up to an app so bug-officianados can tell us what we saw.

This little obervation station was modest, but holds a much more powerful refractor than we have at home. Of course, the roof opens and then you can see out. Otherwise, the astronomers set their own scopes out on gravel pads outside.

I love these weekend adventures because it gets Dad involved and able to participate in what we are learning. 

We were able to meet Sal (in the white shirt) who told us how sun spots form, and that they usually occur in tandem with solar flares. From that, and some searching online, learned that there’s what is called a sun spot cycle, because there’s a rhythm that God gave their existence too. How amazing is our Lord!

“If he commands it, the sun won’t rise and the stars won’t shine. He alone has spread out the heavens and marches on the waves of the sea. He made all the stars—the Bear and Orion, the Pleiades and the constellations of the southern sky. He does great things too marvelous to understand. He performs countless miracles.”

‭‭Job‬ ‭9:7-10‬ ‭NLT‬‬

Even my 2 year old understood he was looking at the sun. How cute!

There is a special filter on these telescopes that allow us to safely see the sun. Otherwise, you’d burn your eye and go blind. We got some safety lessons too, and I appreciate when my children hear safety tips from other adults. You know – because children “tune you out” sometimes – because they hear you all day, especially when you homeschool!

This red image is a picture of what we saw in the lens of the scope with a filter that allowed us to look for solar flares. We didn’t see any solar flares, but we did see some texture on the sun’s corona (outer layer) that was interesting, however, barely observable.

This yellow image was what you see when you’re looking at a lens with a filter that allows you to look for sun spots. No sun spots were visible today.

We drew a sun diagram in the gravel and named the parts of the sun we are learning. We threw rocks into our sun, trying to hit the various spots of interest too. Here you see the sun’s core, radiative zone, convective zone, sun spots (in the photosphere), and corona.

We made up some hand motions to help us learn the sun’s parts too:

  1. We start by making a small ball with our fists. 
  2. Then we blow “helium and hydrogen” in our hands to make our ball “900 times bigger than the Earth”. 
  3. And we then touch each part of the sun, and pretend it burns us, starting with the core (we poke the center of our imaginary sun and shout “Core! Ouch!”
  4. For the radiative zone we move our fingers in and out like we are patting glue or paint into a ball – our imaginary radiative zone is larger than our imaginary core so our hands are about a soccer ball apart from each other. 
  5. For the convective zone we “wave our hands around a ball”, and our hands are about two soccer balls apart from each other.
  6. For the sun spots we “poke the sun in spots further from the center than the convective zone (in the air) in the photosphere to make sun spots”
  7. For a solar flare, we pretend like a “fire cracker is shooting off the side of our imaginary sun in the photosphere”. 
  8. And we move our hands around the “giant circumference of the sun’s corona” in a huge circle mid-air. You get the picture.

Though you can find many more online, here are some cool pages to show you some more about the sun:

I hope you’ve enjoyed this post and got some ideas you could try with your kids this year!

In closing, I leave you with this:

“The heavens proclaim the glory of God. The skies display his craftsmanship. Day after day they continue to speak; night after night they make him known. They speak without a sound or word; their voice is never heard. Yet their message has gone throughout the earth, and their words to all the world. God has made a home in the heavens for the sun. It bursts forth like a radiant bridegroom after his wedding. It rejoices like a great athlete eager to run the race. The sun rises at one end of the heavens and follows its course to the other end. Nothing can hide from its heat.”

‭‭Psalms‬ ‭19:1-6‬ ‭NLT‬‬

Italian Night: Immersion night for CC Cycle 2, Week 5

Sì, buongiorno, sono l’ispettore sanitario.

“Hello, yes, this is the food inspector” – said all children everywhere.

Just thought I’d update on how Italian night went. We are doing Inmersion Nights to correspond with Classical Conversations, Cycle 2, and I wanted to “go to Italy or France” before we moved past these countries in this cycle. I chose Italy.

We started with crabcakes. Thank you Costco. But I made a siracha aioli to go with these – two tablespoons of mayo, a dime of siracha and the juice of half a small lime. Even my toddler liked it. My older son was all “meh” after he took half a bite. At least he tried it!

Thank you Lord for Costco. The following dish was an all over hit. It took me two minutes to cut up the pieces and arrange them. My husband said “this looks amazing!” Thank you, husband, for the thanks. And though this was my least favorite, I am feeding all males, other than myself… so, you know…

This next dish was planned to be risotto, but I didn’t have white wine, arborrio, nor chicken stock. But I did have sweet potatoes. This course is supposed to be meatless. I looked up an Italian sweet potato recipe which I modified. My older son said “ooh that’s the really fancy dish.” These are sweet and sour rosemary potatoes. They taste like dessert, with all that butter and brown sugar. I cut two large sweet potatoes into an accordion, not slicing all the way through, and then sprinkled olive oil, salt and rosemary on them before covering in foil-covered parchment paper and baking on 400 for 30 min. Mix your sweet and sour unhealthy love mix while waiting: two tablespoons of brown sugar with 1/4 cup red wine vinegar and 2 diced tsp butter while you’re waiting. Uncover potatoes, then pour happy unhealthy sweet and sour love mix over your potatoes at the half hour mark. Bake uncovered for 25 minutes. I spooned the love mix back over the potatoes once while baking for good measure.

I made Giada’s salmon recipe. But with lime. That’s what I had. It’s basically a half onion diced, and a drained can of diced tomatoes, with a little olive oil, one small squeezed lime, salt, pepper, thyme and oregano… mixed together to sit and marry for 15 minutes before being generously poured over wild caught salmon fillets which were nestled and tented in foil-covered parchment paper pockets. Then put in the oven for 20-25 minutes. Viola. Perfection.

I just roasted this broccoli for 45 min at 400f with olive oil, a lil’ salt, thyme and oregano. My older son said “come on mom, give me more than just two pieces!” At least he wanted more vegetables, because he found the salmon unpalatable, even though the rest of us scarfed it down. Well… that’s not true. The adults scarfed down the salmon. The toddler asked for more potatoes instead, but who could blame him? I stuck salmon in his mouth at first. The look of offense was real. He shook his head NO and promptly removed said salmon to the plate. However, thank you for your sacrifice, fish. Your life still filled a worthy calling.

There was no room for salad in my belly, but my husband enjoyed it with simple balsamic EVOO dressing. We will finish this tomorrow.

As if this wasn’t enough food, we are then supposed to have a seasonal fruit and cheese plate. How do Italians eat all this food? If you’re Italian, is this how you really do it?! The pears dipped in the potato sauce, by the way, was amazing.

Dark cherry lime honey sorbetto. Need I say more? Put 2 cups of dark frozen cherries, a big squirt of honey (maybe 1/4 cup), and the juice of one small lime in your vitamix and watch the aria begin. Scoop this wonder-mix into a container and stick in the freezer to harden while you’re waiting… trying to eat all this other food… just to get to this palate-cleanser. If you were fancier than I am, you’d put a mint leaf on the side. I ain’t got time fo’ that!

Strictly not Italian, we happened to make these classic chocolate chip cookies after Classical Conversations today. Math lesson, anyone? Of course, we were then obliged to eat warm fresh cookies. I froze two thirds of the cookie dough like a good girl, so we can enjoy the sugar of our labor on another special night. We don’t usually do dessert during the week. It’s 1 stick of room temperature butter mixed with 1/2 cup sugar and 1/2 cup brown sugar. Add one beaten egg with 1 tsp vanilla, mixed, to mixer. Add 1/2 tsp baking soda and 1 cup flour plus two Tsp flour to mixer. Add 1/2 cup dark chocolate chips. Scoop out with small scooper or tsp-sized balls on parchment lined cookie sheet, about two inches from each other. Place into fridge to cool. Preheat oven to 375 and bake for 9-10 minutes in the center rack. Let cool… but not too cool!

Italians finish with a fruit or herbal drink. I chose chocolate milk and marshmallows instead. Because. But this sneaky mom added protein powder with greens, and magnesium powder. Because.

Oh and there were no dishes to clean up, because guess who cleaned up as the night wore on? And I didn’t even mind.

#winning